Tag Archives: vintage oriental rug

Soft Red Oriental Rug

Deals on Room-Size Rugs

Because we are beginning to focus on selling rugs smaller than 9×12 we are running a great sale on all of our room-sized rugs. Marked down from already low prices, now is the time to buy if you have been waiting for the perfect extra-large sized rug in our shop. Below are some of our large rugs on sale right now:

Persian Kapoutrang Rug

7′ 11 x 10′ 7 including fringe, beautiful Ivory and Red Persian Kapoutrang Rug, only $612. with Free Shipping! Shop Now >

Above is a traditional vintage Ivory Persian Kapoutrang rug. Check out our rug guide to learn more about Kapoutrang rugs. If you are looking for something a bit larger, find a bold red and green Persian Tabriz below. This one features an all-over pattern highlighted with floral elements, palmettes, deer and bird motifs.

Red Persian Rug

9′ 7 x 13′ 3, this large Persian rug will add character to any space. A soft wool pile will feel warm and welcoming underfoot, while you admire the interesting details of this Persian rug. Marked down to $1067.60  Shop Now >

If you are looking for a larger rug and trying to keep your budget under $1000, find a great deal on a soft red Persian Mashad rug below.

Soft Red Oriental Rug

9′ 5 x 13′ 5 Persian Mashad with a bold center medallion surrounded by all-over patterns set in a soft red field. Only $979.20 Shop Now>

Browse all of our discounted room-sized Oriental rugs here >

 

Persian Heriz Rugs

For as long as they have been around, Oriental rugs have been looked at as a symbol of wealth and importance. Heriz rugs, which are a type of Persian Oriental rug, have long been a favored sub-type. Found in lawyers offices and in the homes of doctors, Heriz rugs are recognized by many for their durability and striking colors. Even over the past few years they have increased in desirability and popularity.

Persian Heriz rug

Genuine Persian Heriz rug c. 1950 Shop Now>

Dominant colors found in Heriz rugs include red, blue, ivory, green and others. They often have brick or rust red fields. The most common design is a large central medallion with several lobes in contrasting colors. However they may have all-over designs with palmette motifs. They are typically found in large 8×10 to 10×14 room sizes, however they do occur in smaller sizes.

Heriz rugs may be referred to as Bakshaish, Mehraban, Serapi or Gorevan depending on their structure. The Serapi type is the finest and often considered the most desirable of Persian rugs. The Gorevan is the lowest quality Heriz, however it is still a fine and beautiful rug type.

Indian Heriz Rug

Indian Heriz Rug Shop Now>

Copies of Heriz rugs are woven in India and cost much less than real Persian Heriz rugs. When you buy a genuine Oriental rug you will be enjoying it for decades and all who enter your home or office will notice it.

Do you have a Persian Heriz rug at home?

Types of Hamedan Rugs

Persian Rug Runner

Traditional Persian Hamedan rug runner with a red field and ivory border. Shop Now >

A name that almost everyone is familiar with in the world of Oriental rugs is Hamedan. Hamedan rugs are a type of Persian rug. They are made in the Hamedan province in what is now called Iran. It is one of the largest weaving areas in the region and the province encompasses hundreds of villages which contributed to it becoming one of the greatest rug markets in Persia. The city of Hamedan is the capital of the Hamedan province.

Hamedan rugs usually have a cotton foundation, a wool pile and are woven with Turkish knots. Older Hamedan rugs may have a wool foundation. Designs include single medallions, multiple medallions, floral motifs and geometric motifs. The design often depends on the village or location where the rug was woven. For example, Bibikabad rugs usually have a small center medallion surrounded by an all-over design while Dergazine rugs almost always have an all-over pattern with floral sprays mimicking Sarouk rugs.

Large Persian Rug

Persian Bibikabad Rug. Bibikabads come in large carpet sizes such as 8×10 and larger. Shop Now >

 

Pink Persian Oriental Rug

Persian Dergazine rug runner with all-over floral pattern. These rugs are similar in style to Sarouk rugs.

With so many different villages and weavers working in the Hamedan province, Hamedan rugs often have the most varied designs of all Oriental rug styles.  Although there are many types of Hamedan rugs, some of the most popular types include Bibikabad, Borchelou, Dergazine, Ingeles, Hussainabad, Kabudrahang, Lilihan, Malayer, Maslaghan, Nahavand, Rudbar, and Tajabad among others. Often times inexperienced rug sellers or even rug dealers may refer to these specific types generally as Hamedans as it can become confusing to use city or village names.

Red Persian rug

A red Persian Hussainabad rug with an all-over Herati pattern. Shop Now >

Hamedan rugs often come in smaller and runner sizes. The sub-types of Hamedans can often be found in more specific sizes. For example, a room-sized Bibikabad or Kabudrahang is very common, while they are not easily found in smaller sizes. A Dergazine may be found in a 4×6 or smaller size, or a runner, but a large room-sized carpet is highly unlikely to be described as a Dergazine.

Red Persian Rug

Large Red Persian Kapoutrang rug. Kapoutrangs often come in large room-sizes such as 8×10 and larger. Shop Now >

The characteristics that can be used to define a rug from the Hamedan region include the weave which is composed of a single weft thread, the knot-type, and the colors. Red, Ivory and Blue are the most commonly used colors in the Hamedan province. As seen in the examples above, each rug has some shade of red, ivory and blue in it. If the rug does not have red, ivory or blue it does not mean it is not a Hamedan, each characteristic of the rug must be looked at to classify the Oriental rug in question.

Do you have any Hamedan rugs in your home?

Red, Pink and White Rugs

Valentine’s Day is coming! Here are some of our Oriental rugs with Valentine’s Day color schemes:

First is this beautiful Ivory Persian Kirman rug. Traditional delicate and intricate floral sprays and soft red and pink highlights add a feminine touch to this vintage Oriental rug. Many floral patterns in Kirman rugs were derived from patterns found in shawls.

Persian Kirman Rug

Persian Kirman rug c. 1950 Shop Now >

Persian Kirman Rug weave

Weave of the Persian Kirman Rug

 

Next is this deep red Dergazine rug. The design features an ivory center medallion accented sharply with blue surrounded by pink flowers.

Red Persian Rug

Red Persian Dergazine rug Shop Now >

 

This traditional Persian Serabend was woven with soft and luxurious wool. The design features a cream-colored field filled with an all-over pattern of botehs or pear motifs. Repeating botehs is the most common design of Serabend rugs.

Serabend Persian Rug

Serabend Persian Rug

Persian rug

Soft and thick wool on a Persian Serabend Shop Now >

 

JessiesRugs.com wishes everyone a Happy Valentine’s Day!

The Value of Persian Rugs

As I mentioned before, some Oriental rugs have price tags comparable to brand new vehicles. You might ask yourself, why would someone spend so much money on something to be walked on? There are several reasons antique Oriental rugs hold their value, and in many cases are worth more as they age.

Antique Persian rug

Antique Persian Kurdistan Bag face with a hand-knotted pile

Persian rugs have long been seen as a symbol of wealth and elite status. This can partly be attributed to older Persian dynasties, such as the Safavid dynasty (1502 – 1736). Many of their courts held some of the best carpets ever made. This period is often referred to as the Golden age of Persian carpets. During this time weavers were trained by the best and utilized the finest materials, such as silk for the pile of the rug accented with silver and gold threads. One of the world’s oldest Oriental carpets from this time is called the Ardabil carpet and is on display at the Victoria and Albert museum. Learn more about the history of this prized piece of art > 

Semi Antique Persian Rug

Semi-Antique Persian Kirman rug with buff-beige field

Older rugs from these palaces and from these looms have long been sought after by dealers and collectors. When one of these rugs goes onto the auction block it is sure to turn into an exciting bidding war. Recently a record was broken at Sotheby’s for the most expensive Oriental carpet which went for $33,765,000. This is obviously not the norm, but occasionally rugs like that do come on the market. Learn more about this stunning rug >

Oriental rug for sale

Close-up of the knots making up the Persian Kurdistan pictured above

When you look at the back of a rug to see each and every knot tied by skillful weavers it is hard not to imagine why they are worth so much money. The time, effort, and skill put into a Persian rug are reasons enough for the price tag. When you buy a Persian rug, you are making an investment. The majority of rugs will last generations, and the rug you buy today could be the rug laid in your granddaughter’s living room. These rugs will last a lifetime. So when faced with the decision of buying a genuine Oriental rug or a machine-made copy, the choice is obvious. A machine-made rug (unless one of the more desirable brands such as Karastan) will not last your lifetime, and they will not become prettier as they wear such as Oriental rugs do.

The last reason I will mention for the desirability of Persian rugs in the United States is the embargo on Iran. At a later date I will delve deeper into it, but the fact that no Persian rugs are being imported to the USA means everyone wants to snatch up the rugs available here now.

Shop authentic Persian rugs >

What types of rugs do you have in your home? How long has a rug been in your family? Share your thoughts below!