Tag Archives: rugs

Soft Red Oriental Rug

Deals on Room-Size Rugs

Because we are beginning to focus on selling rugs smaller than 9×12 we are running a great sale on all of our room-sized rugs. Marked down from already low prices, now is the time to buy if you have been waiting for the perfect extra-large sized rug in our shop. Below are some of our large rugs on sale right now:

Persian Kapoutrang Rug

7′ 11 x 10′ 7 including fringe, beautiful Ivory and Red Persian Kapoutrang Rug, only $612. with Free Shipping! Shop Now >

Above is a traditional vintage Ivory Persian Kapoutrang rug. Check out our rug guide to learn more about Kapoutrang rugs. If you are looking for something a bit larger, find a bold red and green Persian Tabriz below. This one features an all-over pattern highlighted with floral elements, palmettes, deer and bird motifs.

Red Persian Rug

9′ 7 x 13′ 3, this large Persian rug will add character to any space. A soft wool pile will feel warm and welcoming underfoot, while you admire the interesting details of this Persian rug. Marked down to $1067.60  Shop Now >

If you are looking for a larger rug and trying to keep your budget under $1000, find a great deal on a soft red Persian Mashad rug below.

Soft Red Oriental Rug

9′ 5 x 13′ 5 Persian Mashad with a bold center medallion surrounded by all-over patterns set in a soft red field. Only $979.20 Shop Now>

Browse all of our discounted room-sized Oriental rugs here >

 

Great Buys Under $150

We have been adding a bunch of vintage and antique Oriental rugs to our inventory. If you are looking to add a fresh look to your home with a Persian rug and you are on a tight budget, you have come to the right place.

red persian rug

Red Persian Hamedan rug $140 Shop Now >

Hamedan rugs are one of the most common types of Persian rugs. To learn more about this type of rug check out our Hamedan rug Guide.

red persian rug with geometric design

Persian Karaja rug $140, Shop Now >

Karaja rugs are also a type of Persian rug. These rugs generally have a more tribal look than Hamedan rugs, but can be found in similar colors like the one represented above. Many Karaja rugs feature a trio of recognizable medallions similar to the medallions above.

Red Oriental rug

Pakistan Bokhara rug $132, Shop Now >

Bokhara rugs, like the one pictured above, are often the easiest type of Oriental rug to identify for beginners. This is due to the gul medallion design seen in the field above. The larger the Bokhara rug, the more rows of guls it will have. These Pakistan Bokhara rugs are very popular as they come in all different sizes and colors making them easy to decorate with. Learn more about these rugs with our Guide to Bokhara rugs.

If you are looking for a larger size, you can find all of our rugs at JessiesRugs.com

Oriental Rugs In The Kitchen: Good or Bad Idea?

Putting a mat in the kitchen by the sink is pretty common, but in the last few years Persian and Oriental rugs have been replacing those generic mats in the kitchen. Every one has a different opinion on whether or not you should have an antique or vintage hand knotted rug in your kitchen. A Persian rug will look great almost anywhere you place it, but here are a few tips for those who dare to decorate the floors in their kitchen with Oriental rugs.

Rug Runner

Persian Rug Runner

1. Choose colors wisely: Don’t go with white, or light color schemes if you get messy in the kitchen. Although the rug may look stunning, you don’t want to cook pasta one night and have the red sauce spilled all over your beautiful new rug. The majority of Oriental rugs are forgiving, so if you do spill something on it, quickly follow guidelines to remove the stain or take it to a professional cleaner.

2. Choose an appropriate design: An Oriental rug with an open field may not be the best choice for a kitchen floor. Many Persian rugs have elaborate designs with all-over patterns or intricate medallions. By choosing a rug with a full design any stains on the carpet should be masked by the pattern.

3. Choose a rug with good pile-height: Half the reason most people have for having a mat or rug in the kitchen is to have something comfortable to stand on while cooking or doing dishes versus a hard floor. If this is your reason, make sure you find a good rug pad and/or a rug with thick pile and a lot of life left for support.

4. Follow simple rules for caring for Oriental rugs: See our rug guides for easy methods for caring for your Oriental rugs >

Shop the rugs pictured above and others at JessiesRugs.com

 

Modern, Antique & Vintage Rugs

One of the easier characteristics to identify of an Oriental rug is often the age. Of course there are variables that may cause premature wear or color fading in a newer rug causing it to appear older, but for the most part rugs can be split into different categories by age.

Modern or contemporary rugs are those rugs woven in the last 20 years or so. Quality varies depending on origin, however when compared with a rug woven 40+ years ago it is easy to tell the difference. There is one complication when dealing with modern rugs. When some rug dealers discovered the market for antique rugs, they wanted to appeal to decorators and designers by wearing down the pile of their freshly woven rugs. The wear gives the appearance of an antique rug, however these rugs are not antique. After practicing, it should be relatively easy to determine whether a rug is antique or new by inspecting the weave. The rug pictured below is a contemporary Indian scatter rug.

Oriental rug

Red Oriental Rug

Indian Rug

Weave of an Oriental rug

Sometimes customers confuse the terms antique and vintage. An item is typically classified as antique if it was made 100 or more years ago, while a semi antique object would be around 50-100 years old. The terms semi antique and vintage are often used interchangeably. Vintage can describe an item over around 40 years old, but it can also describe a specific period in time. The rug pictured below is a vintage Persian Karaja rug.

Persian Karaja rug

Vintage Persian Karaja

Note the differences between the vintage Persian rug above and the first contemporary Indian rug pictured before it.

For further comparison, note the fine weave of the antique Persian Kirman below. Although many antique rugs are worn due to traffic wear and use, there are some which are preserved either from being hung on a wall or not laid on the floor. Therefore, if you come across a rug without wear it doesn’t necessarily mean it is not antique. Many professionals often have their antique rugs restored, making them appear as though they have just come off the loom.

Persian rug

Weave of an Antique Persian Kirman rug

Antique Persian Rug

Antique Persian Kirman rug

Do you like antique rugs, or modern rugs? Personally, I like them all.

Find these rugs and more at JessiesRugs.com

How to Take Care of Oriental Rugs

It’s the time of year when boots come out of the closet, salt and sand are spread on the roads and sidewalks, and everyone is trekking ice and dirt into the house. So how do you protect your antique rugs from damage without rolling them up and putting them into storage?

  1. Regular vacuuming. Vacuuming your rugs weekly or more often will help prevent abrasive sand and salt from being embedded underneath the pile of the rug causing premature wear. If you are unsure of the best method of vacuuming your carpet, read our rug guide on vacuuming.Vacuuming rugs
  2. Spare Mats At Entryways. Having a few spare mats around 2′ x 3′ laid out at doors and entrance ways will help remove some of the dirt and water on your guests’ boots.
  3. Rotating. By rotating rugs placed in high-traffic areas or areas in direct sunlight, you allow for an even distribution of wear. Ideally, rugs are not placed in direct sunlight as it may cause fading. Rotating your rugs monthly is a good idea so they don’t end up with an unsightly area of wear from foot traffic.
  4. Common Repairs. Inspecting your rug for damage every once in a while is important. Catching moths early before they eat the wool pile can save you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars. Also, simple repairs such as overcasting to protect the fringe ends from losing knots, or re-binding of edges to secure them will also save your rug.
  5. Professional Cleanings. Whether you have your rugs professionally cleaned or follow this DIY guide, it is important to clean your rugs yearly or every two years depending on traffic. Springtime is often the most popular time to clean rugs after a long winter of grime and dirt.

 

Alphabetical Oriental Rug Term Glossary

For every letter of the alphabet there are many Oriental rug terms, but this time I only selected one for each. Enjoy the list I came up with below!

Abrash: Color variation in a handmade Oriental rug. Abrash is often due to differences in wool quality or dyeing methods.

Border: Oriental rugs may have one or many borders. The border is the design which surrounds the main area of the carpet, similar to a frame of a picture.

Cartoon: A color drawing of a rug on graph paper which is followed by the weavers as a template.

Dyes: Synthetic or Natural dyes are used to color the wool used in weaving an Oriental rug.

Edge: The edge of the rug is typically bound by wool to secure the foundation and knots. The edges may become worn down over time and need to be rebound.

Fringe: The fringe of an Oriental rug is found at each end, and is typically white in color. It is formed from the warp threads of the foundation.

Ground/Field: The ground is the main area of the rug where the principle color and design are located within the borders.

Hamedan: One of the most common types of Persian rug. Comprised of many villages, the region of Hamedan produces a variety of different rugs.  Learn more about Hamedan rugs>

Indigo: Blue dye is obtained from the Indigo plant and also made synthetically.

Jufti: The jufti knot is found as both Persian and Turkish knots, however, rather than wrapping around single foundation threads, the knot wraps around pairs of threads. This speeds up the weaving process but forms a rug of lower quality than those woven with typical knots.

Knots: Knots make the pile in Hand-knotted Oriental rugs. There are several types of knots but the two general types are Persian (asymmetrical) and Turkish (symmetrical).

Loom: A loom is a frame used to weave textiles and rugs.

Medallion: A medallion design is a common pattern found in traditional Oriental rugs. It may be a diamond shape, or it may have floral elements. The most typical design including a medallion features a single medallion in the center of the rug.

Ningxia: Beautiful carpets woven with traditional Chinese motifs and designs in yellow tones.

Overcasting: A method used to secure fringe ends from unraveling due to wear.

Painting: Applying paint to the front of the rug after it has been woven. Washed and painted Sarouks were very common in the mid 20th century. Dealers were often stripping areas of color and re-dyeing or “painting” them with a different color to appeal to the rug market.

Qashqai: A tribal style rug woven in the southwest region of Iran.

Re-weave: A repair type used to fix damaged areas due to moth, or dry rot. The repair person cuts out the damage and uses the appropriate color and design to re-weave the area.

Silk: Silk, like wool, is a material found in some fine carpets. It can be used as the pile, as highlights in the pile, and as the foundation.  There are cheaper copies of fine carpets which use artificial silk.

Tribal rug: A village or nomadic rug woven with bold colors, and strong geometric shapes and designs.

Ushak: A highly desirable antique Turkish rug type with muted color schemes and known for popular styles including the Lotto and Holbein carpets.

Vase Carpet: A popular carpet woven in Kerman, Iran from the 17-18th century featuring floral motifs and curvilinear patterns.

Warp/Weft: The specific foundation threads of a hand-knotted Oriental rug. The warp threads run vertically and the weft threads are horizontal.

Xinjiang: Type of antique Chinese carpet woven with bright, contrasting colors.

Yastik: A very small, usually red, Turkish rug type which is popular among collectors.

Z-Spun: Yarn is either spun in a counter-clockwise (Z) direction or a clockwise (S) direction.

 

Also, check out some of the new authentic Oriental rugs we have been adding daily to our site!

 

4 Best Sites To Follow About Rugs

If you are just getting started in the world of Oriental rugs, there are some really great sites to check out with guides and facts about antique rugs. Below are some of the top sites I follow for Oriental rug news and information.

persian rug

Antique Persian Rug

1. One of the most thorough sites on the web to learn about Oriental rugs is JBOC’s Notes on Oriental rugs. Here you will find a surplus of information on almost every single type of Oriental rug you could imagine as well as many photograph examples of each rug type.

2. Hali is a well-known textile and Oriental rug magazine featuring up to date articles on what is going on in the rug industry. At Hali.com you can find out about current events and exhibitions at museums in your area as well as famous auctions with Oriental rugs for sale.

3. Jozan, like Hali, is another Oriental rug magazine. They feature a variety of educational materials with many rug photos and also highlight current happenings in the world of rugs.

4. Last, I will mention our site, JessiesRugs.com where you can find a variety of DIY guides and informational materials on types of Oriental rugs including “How to Hand Wash an Oriental rug” and “A Guide to Oriental Rug Motifs”

Although there are plenty of sites online for educational rug guides, I would also advise stopping by your local library to see if they have any books on rugs. Sometime in the near future I will highlight some of my favorite Oriental rug books.

Persian Karaja Rugs

Persian Karaja rugs (also spelled Karadagh Gharadjeh) are woven in the Northwestern region of Iran near Tabriz. These rugs have a very similar weave and character to Heriz rugs which are also woven nearby. They are woven with single wefts, and Turkish knots similar to those woven in the Hamedan province. For that reason they are sometimes mistaken for Persian Kurdistan rugs.

Persian Karaja rug

Persian Karaja Rug with typical geometric motifs and medallions

Most Karaja rugs are easily distinguishable by their design which often consists of vertical Heriz-style medallions. We recently added several Karaja rugs to our shop which can be seen below. Reds, Blues, Ivory, Rust and Orange are common color schemes found in Karaja rugs. Karaja rugs are quite popular for their bold designs and tribal nature.

Red Persian rug

Red Field Persian Karaja rug with three vertical medallions

Karaja rug medallion

Persian Karaja medallion in semi-antique rug

Persian Karaja rug runner

Same Karaja medallion woven in a newer Persian Karaja rug c. 1970. Interesting animal figures found in the field include deer and birds.

Shop our selection of Karaja rugs and other antique Oriental rugs>

For more info on Karaja rugs and the different types of Karajas, check out this guide>

Persian Rug Infographic

This is a simple infographic summarizing the general characteristics of Persian rugs.

Persian rugs

Persian rug Infographic

The different types of Persian rugs are named after the region in which they are woven. For example, a Hamedan rug will be made in either the province or city Hamedan in Iran. There are several exceptions to this rule such as Sarouk rugs which are made in the city of Arak as well as Saruk.

Persian rugs are not only the most well-known type of Oriental rug, but one of the most popular. Many associate the Persian rug with wealth and luxury. The two general types of Persian rugs are those made in cities and those made in villages. They are distinguishable by their weave, materials and designs. When grouped together city rugs will appear more uniform, as they follow stricter patterns.

The designs found in Persian rugs vary greatly from single or multiple medallions to all-over patterns with floral or geometric elements. Whether you are looking for a tribal rug with bold colors or a sophisticated floral rug with soft curvilinear designs, you can be sure to find what you are looking for in our selection of Persian rugs.

Adding New Rugs Daily

Mike and I have been super busy restocking our shop with beautiful Oriental rugs! Check out some of our newly added beauties below:

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Shop our rugs here>