Tag Archives: jessies rugs

Tips For the Entry Level Rug Collector

Every Oriental rug connoisseur and professional had to start somewhere. When you are just starting to get your feet wet in the world of Oriental rugs all of the different names and styles can get quite overwhelming, especially if you are not yet able to tell the difference between a machine made rug and a hand-knotted rug.

Oriental Rug

One of my favorite Oriental rug finds, the colors brightened so much after Mike washed it!

When Mike and I first started out we made quite a few impulse buys that did not turn out quite as planned. The beginners eye is not yet trained to the characteristics of a hand-knotted rug compared to those of a machine loomed rug. Even when shopping at a reputable rug dealers store you should have a rough idea of what exactly you are looking for so that you don’t end up over-paying.

Below is a list of tips and tricks that helped give me the education and confidence in dealing with handmade Oriental rugs.

  1. Utilize the web. There is so much information on the internet nowadays it is unbelievable how much knowledge is accessible through google. Not all of the information on Oriental rugs is accurate, to save you some time here are some valuable resources that I have found to be helpful over the years:
    1. http://www.spongobongo.com/ This one is like the encyclopedia of Oriental rugs. If you are trying to figure out whether you have a Caucasian Kazak or a Turkish Melas, this site has almost everything you need to identify and learn about all the different rug types.
    2. http://www.rugrag.com/ Rug Rag is a great tool for dealers and beginners, especially their forums section. There you can upload photos of rugs you might be interested in and get expert opinions on their worth and what they are.
    3. https://jessiesrugs.com/content/16-oriental-rug-guides Lastly, I would be remiss if I didn’t recommend our rug guide section. Over the years we have composed a variety of guides including caring for your rugs and identifying authentic Oriental rugs.
  2. Haggle. When I was little my grandfather used to take me to flea markets where he would make offers and haggle with sellers to get the best deal. Who doesn’t like to save a few bucks? Honestly there have been a few times that I have felt uncomfortable negotiating on a price, but you will never know if you don’t try and what do you have to lose?

    Caucasian Lesghi rug

    A stunning Caucasian rug

  3. Inspect, Inspect, Inspect. One of the worse possible experiences you can have when buying antique or vintage rugs is odors. Mike and I have become extremely talented at removing stains and professionally washing the antique rugs we get in our shop. That’s not to say we didn’t have our fair share of mistakes. In the beginning we overpaid quite a few times for rugs that had moth damage (easy to spot when you know what to look for), dry rot (also easy to spot), and odors. Never feel uncomfortable smelling a rug, especially when you are the one shelling out the money for it and it will be sitting on your living room floor.
  4. Let someone in on your knowledge. They say mastering a subject is easier when you are able to teach someone else about it. Luckily for me the subject of Oriental rugs was fascinating to my family. Everyone wanted to know how we knew what to look for and what to stay away from. If you can find someone who is interested in learning about Oriental rugs you will find sharing your experience and ideas will only add to your confidence.

    Oriental rugs for sale

    You never know what kind of deals you may find…

  5. Don’t get overwhelmed. It is very easy to be taken advantage of when you don’t have a lot of experience with dealers. They want you to buy their rugs, but it is your responsibility to make sure you are getting the best deal. Not every dealer is out to get you, but you have to be careful and complete your research before making a purchase, never feel rushed into making an impulsive buy.

 

Top 5 Rugs for Bohemian Decorating at JessiesRugs.com

Below are 5 rugs currently offered at JessiesRugs.com that are perfect for adding a piece of energetic flare to your decorating space.

Antique Caucasian Rug

4′ 8 x 6′ Antique Caucasian rug Shop Now >

For a medium sized space our 4′ 8 x 6′ Antique Caucasian rug would be a perfect fit. When I first saw this rug I fell in love with the unique pink and baby blue highlights. This rug has the perfect amount of wear, and a bold all-over pattern to drive home that energetic look of a Bohemian space.

Persian Rug Runner

3′ 8 x 9′ Persian Kurdistan Rug Runner Shop Now >

When you are trying to finish off a long space such as a hallway or narrow room, this 3′ 8 x 9′ Persian Kurdistan rug could be just the piece you have been looking for. With long, narrow medallions set in a bold salmon colored field this runner will accentuate any tribal or boho space.

Persian Shiraz Rug

Small Persian Shiraz Rug Shop Now >

This 2′ 6 x 4′ 3 Persian Shiraz rug has the most beautiful bright blue highlights. With an eye-catching design and a soft wool pile to sink your feet into this rug is perfect for a small space like in front of the kitchen sink.

Antique Caucasian Rug

2′ 10 x 4′ 3 Antique Caucasian Lesghi rug Shop Now >

Or, you can capture an antique look balanced with tribal style with this stunning 2′ 10 x 4′ 3 Caucasian Lesghi rug. Traditional antique Lesghi rugs are enormously popular among rug collectors. This bold and energetic pattern will be a riveting addition to any space.

Turkish Sparta rug

3′ 2 x 6′ 6 Turkish Sparta rug Shop Now >

Lastly, we have our 3′ 2 x 6′ 6 Purple Turkish Sparta rug. Featuring a bold geometric design with interesting animal figures scattered throughout, this rug will liven up any room.

Whether you are looking for tribal-style rugs, elegant traditional Persian rugs or something in between, browse JessiesRugs.com to find the perfect one of a kind rug to fit your space. If we don’t have exactly what you’re looking for be sure to send us a note and we will keep an eye out for you as our inventory is constantly changing.

Great Buys Under $150

We have been adding a bunch of vintage and antique Oriental rugs to our inventory. If you are looking to add a fresh look to your home with a Persian rug and you are on a tight budget, you have come to the right place.

red persian rug

Red Persian Hamedan rug $140 Shop Now >

Hamedan rugs are one of the most common types of Persian rugs. To learn more about this type of rug check out our Hamedan rug Guide.

red persian rug with geometric design

Persian Karaja rug $140, Shop Now >

Karaja rugs are also a type of Persian rug. These rugs generally have a more tribal look than Hamedan rugs, but can be found in similar colors like the one represented above. Many Karaja rugs feature a trio of recognizable medallions similar to the medallions above.

Red Oriental rug

Pakistan Bokhara rug $132, Shop Now >

Bokhara rugs, like the one pictured above, are often the easiest type of Oriental rug to identify for beginners. This is due to the gul medallion design seen in the field above. The larger the Bokhara rug, the more rows of guls it will have. These Pakistan Bokhara rugs are very popular as they come in all different sizes and colors making them easy to decorate with. Learn more about these rugs with our Guide to Bokhara rugs.

If you are looking for a larger size, you can find all of our rugs at JessiesRugs.com

Persian Rug Infographic

This is a simple infographic summarizing the general characteristics of Persian rugs.

Persian rugs

Persian rug Infographic

The different types of Persian rugs are named after the region in which they are woven. For example, a Hamedan rug will be made in either the province or city Hamedan in Iran. There are several exceptions to this rule such as Sarouk rugs which are made in the city of Arak as well as Saruk.

Persian rugs are not only the most well-known type of Oriental rug, but one of the most popular. Many associate the Persian rug with wealth and luxury. The two general types of Persian rugs are those made in cities and those made in villages. They are distinguishable by their weave, materials and designs. When grouped together city rugs will appear more uniform, as they follow stricter patterns.

The designs found in Persian rugs vary greatly from single or multiple medallions to all-over patterns with floral or geometric elements. Whether you are looking for a tribal rug with bold colors or a sophisticated floral rug with soft curvilinear designs, you can be sure to find what you are looking for in our selection of Persian rugs.

Adding New Rugs Daily

Mike and I have been super busy restocking our shop with beautiful Oriental rugs! Check out some of our newly added beauties below:

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Shop our rugs here>

Where Are Oriental Rugs Made?

The answer to the question “Where are Oriental rugs made?” is not a simple one. Oriental rugs have been woven all over, not just in one specific country or even continent. Generally, Oriental rugs are defined as any rug made in a broad geographical area stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific.

Persian rug

Persian Borchelou rug c. 1940 Shop Now >

One of the most common regions associated with hand knotted Oriental rugs is Persia, in a country known today as Iran. Persian rugs are so popular in fact, that customers often confuse the term Persian rug with Oriental rugs. All Persian rugs are Oriental rugs, but the reverse is not true. An Oriental rug may also define a Chinese rug, or a hand knotted rug made in Spain.

Below is a list of the common Oriental rug producing countries:

Iran (Rugs produced here are commonly referred to as Persian rugs)

Turkey

The Caucasus (Caucasian Rugs)

China

Afghanistan

Pakistan

India

Romania

Spain

Taiwan

Morocco

 

Where are your Oriental rugs from?

How to Combine More Than One Rug in a Space

Not all of us are professional designers, and sometimes it’s difficult to determine whether two rugs are a good match for a specific space or theme.

Caucasian Kazak rug

There are a variety of ways to combine more than one rug in a space. Some characteristics to consider include texture (is the rug wool, silk or camel/goat hair), color, pattern (geometric, floral, traditional, tribal), age (vintage, antique, modern), and origin (where was the rug made?).

As a beginner, it is a good idea to combine “like with like”. If you are looking to create a space with antique items, you may want to incorporate worn rugs. Combining worn rugs with new, full-piled rugs can get confusing if you are just starting out. Another helpful hint is to utilize rugs that originate in the same region. For example, these two rugs were made in Persia (Iran):

Antique Persian Rug

Persian Hamedan rug Shop Now >

Persian rug runner

Antique Persian Kurdistan rug runner Shop Now >

If you are a stickler for uniformity, you may want to delve deeper and choose rugs from the same province. These two Persian rugs are from the Hamedan region of Iran.

Red Persian Rug

Dergazine Red Persian Rug Shop Now >

 

Red Persian Rug

Red Persian Dergazine Rug Shop Now >

It is also possible to combine rugs from different regions that have similar features. For example, the rugs below both have a tribal look and feel as they are both all wool. They also have similar ages.

Caucasian Kazak rug

Caucasian Kazak rug Shop Now >

Persian Bagface

Persian Bagface Shop Now >

 

What rug decorating themes do you have in your house?

The Value of Persian Rugs

As I mentioned before, some Oriental rugs have price tags comparable to brand new vehicles. You might ask yourself, why would someone spend so much money on something to be walked on? There are several reasons antique Oriental rugs hold their value, and in many cases are worth more as they age.

Antique Persian rug

Antique Persian Kurdistan Bag face with a hand-knotted pile

Persian rugs have long been seen as a symbol of wealth and elite status. This can partly be attributed to older Persian dynasties, such as the Safavid dynasty (1502 – 1736). Many of their courts held some of the best carpets ever made. This period is often referred to as the Golden age of Persian carpets. During this time weavers were trained by the best and utilized the finest materials, such as silk for the pile of the rug accented with silver and gold threads. One of the world’s oldest Oriental carpets from this time is called the Ardabil carpet and is on display at the Victoria and Albert museum. Learn more about the history of this prized piece of art > 

Semi Antique Persian Rug

Semi-Antique Persian Kirman rug with buff-beige field

Older rugs from these palaces and from these looms have long been sought after by dealers and collectors. When one of these rugs goes onto the auction block it is sure to turn into an exciting bidding war. Recently a record was broken at Sotheby’s for the most expensive Oriental carpet which went for $33,765,000. This is obviously not the norm, but occasionally rugs like that do come on the market. Learn more about this stunning rug >

Oriental rug for sale

Close-up of the knots making up the Persian Kurdistan pictured above

When you look at the back of a rug to see each and every knot tied by skillful weavers it is hard not to imagine why they are worth so much money. The time, effort, and skill put into a Persian rug are reasons enough for the price tag. When you buy a Persian rug, you are making an investment. The majority of rugs will last generations, and the rug you buy today could be the rug laid in your granddaughter’s living room. These rugs will last a lifetime. So when faced with the decision of buying a genuine Oriental rug or a machine-made copy, the choice is obvious. A machine-made rug (unless one of the more desirable brands such as Karastan) will not last your lifetime, and they will not become prettier as they wear such as Oriental rugs do.

The last reason I will mention for the desirability of Persian rugs in the United States is the embargo on Iran. At a later date I will delve deeper into it, but the fact that no Persian rugs are being imported to the USA means everyone wants to snatch up the rugs available here now.

Shop authentic Persian rugs >

What types of rugs do you have in your home? How long has a rug been in your family? Share your thoughts below!

Happy Holidays from JessiesRugs.com

Wishing everyone a very Happy Holiday season and New Year! Check back in 2015 for some great discount antique Oriental rugs and more!

Persian Kazvin Rug

Mike with a very large Persian Kazvin rug

 

Persian Kazvin Rug

Jess with the Persian Kazvin rug

 

Persian Kazvin Rug

All rolled out

Slowly moving in to our new location

Recently we moved our warehouse to a new location.

Discount Oriental rug warehouse

Mike is pretty happy with the new space.

It took a while to get the heat turned on, as you can see our system is older than some of our antique Oriental rugs.

Antique heating system

The Thermolier is keeping us toasty this season!

And a back shot of the fan in the heating system:

Antique Heating System

Pumping out heat

Next on the list was installing blinds.

Installing Blinds

Installing blinds

This looks easier than it was. Mike had to stand on a wobbly plastic fold out table to reach the top, but the finished product looks perfect!

Blinds Installed

Beautiful blinds!

Next on the list was installing the floor. We found these great planks at Home Depot that snap together easily.

Wood floor installation

Snapping the planks together.

It might look like Mike’s doing all the work, but someone had to take the pictures…

Oriental rug photos

Mike installing wood floor for our Oriental rug photos

Sarouk Rug

Persian Sarouk rug on the new floor

We completed the floor yesterday and we are finally able to take pictures of some of the rugs we got almost a month ago. This one in particular is a gorgeous Sarouk Persian rug.

It’s looking pretty empty right now because we haven’t installed our alarm system yet. Once the alarm is installed we will be bringing the rest of our rugs from storage.

Oriental rugs online

The finished product

Check out some of our newly listed one of a kind discount Oriental rugs at JessiesRugs.com.