Tag Archives: authentic oriental rug

Persian Heriz Rugs

For as long as they have been around, Oriental rugs have been looked at as a symbol of wealth and importance. Heriz rugs, which are a type of Persian Oriental rug, have long been a favored sub-type. Found in lawyers offices and in the homes of doctors, Heriz rugs are recognized by many for their durability and striking colors. Even over the past few years they have increased in desirability and popularity.

Persian Heriz rug

Genuine Persian Heriz rug c. 1950 Shop Now>

Dominant colors found in Heriz rugs include red, blue, ivory, green and others. They often have brick or rust red fields. The most common design is a large central medallion with several lobes in contrasting colors. However they may have all-over designs with palmette motifs. They are typically found in large 8×10 to 10×14 room sizes, however they do occur in smaller sizes.

Heriz rugs may be referred to as Bakshaish, Mehraban, Serapi or Gorevan depending on their structure. The Serapi type is the finest and often considered the most desirable of Persian rugs. The Gorevan is the lowest quality Heriz, however it is still a fine and beautiful rug type.

Indian Heriz Rug

Indian Heriz Rug Shop Now>

Copies of Heriz rugs are woven in India and cost much less than real Persian Heriz rugs. When you buy a genuine Oriental rug you will be enjoying it for decades and all who enter your home or office will notice it.

Do you have a Persian Heriz rug at home?

Unsymmetrical Rugs: Imperfections in Authentic Oriental Rugs

If you are looking for a perfect, symmetrical, uniform-looking rug you should probably check out machine made rugs. A while ago, someone asked me why her Persian rug looked different from one end to the other. Like anything else made by hand, there will be imperfections in authentic Oriental rugs. Granted, some of those imperfections may be intentional, and some may be more pronounced than others.

Machine Made Oriental Rug

A Machine Made rug with an Oriental rug design.

Tribal rugs woven on horizontal looms in village settings are more likely to have imperfections than those woven on vertical looms in the cities or workshops where weavers strive for perfection.

red persian rug

Persian Joshaghan rug Shop Now >

Above is a hand knotted Persian Joshaghan rug. Note how the sides of the rug are not perfectly straight and the design is not completely uniform. For many customers and rug lovers these are the characteristics which drive the sale of the rug. Each imperfection adds to the one of a kind nature of an antique Oriental rug such as this.

One of the most common occurrences of “flaws” in authentic Oriental rugs is abrash. Abrash is a term used quite often in describing the characteristics of a rug. It refers to a change in the tone of the color of the wool in a specific area of the rug. For example, a field may be dark blue with a thick line of lighter blue running horizontally across it. It is easy to confuse abrash with fading. Fading is a result of long-term exposure of a rug to the sun, and some fading can occur due to wear depending on the dyes used in the rug.

persian rug runner

Abrash in a Persian rug runner Shop Now >

The rug pictured above has notable abrash at one end. Note how the band runs horizontally along the same path a weaver would be tying the knots onto the foundation. This type of variation in color would not be called fading because fading is uneven and it would be very difficult to achieve this look after completion. Abrash occurs when the weaver changes wool lots, most often because the last lot has run out, and the next lot of wool may be lighter, or darker due to any number of variables including the dye time, temperature, and type of mordant among others.

Another common flaw in Oriental rugs is white knots appearing in the field, especially after the rug has seen some traffic. These knots are the tail ends of the foundation as seen below.

Turkish sparta rug

Knot tails in a Turkish Sparta rug

 

What type of unique imperfection does your Oriental rug have?

Green Dyes in Oriental Rugs

Before synthetic dyes were introduced in the late 1800’s, Oriental rugs were dyed with colors extracted from the surrounding environment including plants, minerals and even insects. These dyes are usually called vegetable dyes. At an early age people are taught mixing yellow and blue makes green. This well-known fact was also applied to antique Oriental rugs made with vegetable dyes.

Green Oriental rug

Indian Oriental rug with a green field

The color blue was obtained from the indigo plant. After dyeing the wool blue, it was dyed yellow. Yellow dye was often obtained from various flowers including Saffron, Larkspur, vine leaves, and buckthorn. It is easy to differentiate a green in a vegetable dyed rug versus a synthetic dyed rug by the uneven color in the vegetable dyed rug. Since the wool has been dyed twice the green color in a vegetable dyed rug may have a slightly blue hue in one area and a yellow hue in the other. The synthetic green will be more uniform. Often times, the yellow may fade leaving blue on the pile. If you gently pull the pile apart to an area which has not been exposed to sunlight you will see the color was once green. Yellow splotches may also appear in a vegetable dyed rug from wear which causes the indigo color to rub off over time. Other, less common, sources of green dyes include turmeric berries, and Buckthorn berries which are used to produce Chinese green. In China, the color green signifies renewal and growth.

Chinese Oriental rug

Green and yellow butterfly in a Chinese Oriental rug.

The strength of the color is determined by several variables including the time the yarn spends in the dye pot, the type of spring water used, and the type of mordant used. Green fields are very rare in antique Oriental rugs because green is a holy color in Islam and is rarely walked upon. Since saffron is so expensive and yellow dye is required to make green, the rarity of yellow can also contribute to the lack of green rugs. Green has become more common in Oriental rugs in the last 100 years or so with the introduction of synthetic dyes and the increasing demand for it.

Shop Green Oriental Rugs >

Other Oriental rug dyeing resources:

http://www.turkotek.com/journal/pdyes.html

http://www.nhrugs.com/vegetable%20dyes.html

http://www.richardrothstein.com/oriental-rug-questions.html

 

Spring Cleaning and Washing Those Rugs

It has been a long, harsh winter for the Northeastern United States. All of that snow, and dirty sand has been hard on our cars, but it is also hard on our rugs. The start of spring is often associated with cleaning up your house and selling off old items at yard sales. At this time it is also important to check your rugs out to see how they fared the winter months.

Persian Kerman rug

Persian Kerman rug before being washed

The design in the Persian rug above is slightly muddled, and the colors are duller than one would expect to see. If your rug was placed in a high traffic area during the winter, especially in an area where people did not take off their shoes, your rug will have trapped quite a bit of sand and salt in it’s pile. The pile of the rug is the fluffy wool on the top that makes it so soft. A regular vacuum will not sufficiently remove the sand that has been trapped under the pile. This sand, if left untreated, will slowly erode the wool fibers as people walk across the rug. The best way to remove the dirt embedded in the pile yourself is to flip the rug over and vacuum the backside.

Persian Kerman rug cleaning

Making progress cleaning the rug

A fresh wash will bring the life back into your authentic Oriental rug and make it last for many more years. Check out our guide to hand wash your Oriental rug yourself, or stop by your local rug dealer to get your rug cleaned.

Persian Kerman rug

Kerman rug corner close-up after cleaning

Check JessiesRugs.com to see the full rug after it has dried!

 

Decorating with Room-size Rugs

Everyone’s favorite rug tip when decorating is to put your Oriental rug down first. It is much easier to base the rest of your decor on the colors and patterns in your antique rug. An authentic Oriental rug is a one-of-a-kind piece, and often an investment. Wallpaper, art, paint, furniture and antiques come in all different shapes, sizes, patterns and colors so it is much easier to find a rug you love and work around it rather than working backwards.

 

White Persian Rug

Traditional Ivory Persian Kapoutrang rug c. 1940 Shop now>

If you have very traditional taste in rugs such as a large red rug with a blue border and an ivory center medallion, your journey will be much easier. However if you are looking for a large antique rug with an all-over pattern, a navy field and hot purple highlights you may be looking for a longer time. It is important to have an idea of what characteristics you are looking for in a rug, often times the old saying “when you see it you’ll know it”  holds true and a light will turn on when you find your dream rug.

Art deco chinese rug

Gorgeous Art Deco style Chinese rug, shop it now>

When decorating with a room-size Oriental rug you generally want the rug to ground the furniture in the space. This method ties each component together to form a cohesive space. Keep in mind you want about 18 inches of floor visible around the rug itself unless you are working with a smaller area such as a bathroom or foyer in which case less is better. There is no right or wrong way to place the furniture on the carpet, everyone is different. Options include having all of the furniture on the rug, the front legs of the furniture on the rug, none of the furniture on the rug (if you are looking at a smaller size rug such as 5×8) and more.

Shop our selection of room-size rugs >

How do you decorate with Oriental rugs? Do you put your rug down first or last?

Red, Pink and White Rugs

Valentine’s Day is coming! Here are some of our Oriental rugs with Valentine’s Day color schemes:

First is this beautiful Ivory Persian Kirman rug. Traditional delicate and intricate floral sprays and soft red and pink highlights add a feminine touch to this vintage Oriental rug. Many floral patterns in Kirman rugs were derived from patterns found in shawls.

Persian Kirman Rug

Persian Kirman rug c. 1950 Shop Now >

Persian Kirman Rug weave

Weave of the Persian Kirman Rug

 

Next is this deep red Dergazine rug. The design features an ivory center medallion accented sharply with blue surrounded by pink flowers.

Red Persian Rug

Red Persian Dergazine rug Shop Now >

 

This traditional Persian Serabend was woven with soft and luxurious wool. The design features a cream-colored field filled with an all-over pattern of botehs or pear motifs. Repeating botehs is the most common design of Serabend rugs.

Serabend Persian Rug

Serabend Persian Rug

Persian rug

Soft and thick wool on a Persian Serabend Shop Now >

 

JessiesRugs.com wishes everyone a Happy Valentine’s Day!

Top Five Oriental Rugs for Tribal Decor

Oriental rugs come in all shapes, sizes, designs, and colors. So which types of Oriental rugs fit best with tribal decor?

Authentic Oriental rugs already have an exotic edge due to the imperfections that arise in the weaving process, but these five Oriental rug types are sure to be the perfect addition to your eclectic room.

Top 5 Tribal Rugs

1. Kilim Rugs

Afghan Kilim Rug

Afghan Kilim Soumack Rug with dark and neutral tones. Shop this rug >

Kilim rugs come from all over. With their bold geometric patterns and bright solid colors they rank at the top for fitting with tribal decor. The Kilim rug above was made in Afghanistan circa 1960. The design features alternating zig-zag patterns in neutral tones.

The Kilim below was made in Turkey around the 1940’s. It’s bold green-blue center medallion set in a berry-red field will brighten your room and add a bohemian touch to your decorating scheme.

Turkish Kilim Rug

Bold Antique Turkish Kilim Rug. Shop Now >

 

2. Baluch Rugs

True Baluch rugs originate in Baluchistan, a region which stretches across Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan. These tribal rugs were woven by nomadic tribes. Rusts and Browns are common tones found in Baluch rugs.  The Baluch below was made around 1910 and has even wear throughout.

Antique Baluch Oriental Rug

Antique Baluch Rug with navy highlights. Shop Now >

This is another Baluch rug from the same time period. This rug has a much bolder color scheme and would attract more attention in a tribal room.

Antique Baluch rug

Antique Baluch rug with bright blue highlights. Shop Now >

 

3. Afghan Rugs

The majority of rugs woven in Afghanistan have a true tribal look to them as many are hand made by nomadic weavers. The rug below features three geometric medallions set in a beige camel-colored field.

Afghan Oriental Rug

Afghan Oriental rug with a tribal design and multiple dark borders. Shop it now >

The rug below was woven in Afghanistan in the 70’s. Although it is modern, the design follows a traditional tribal pattern. The only thing not traditional about this rug is the exotic color scheme. This rug would add a touch of life to any room.

Red Afghan Tribal Rug

Vintage Afghan tribal rug woven with bright reds and orange. Shop now >

 

4. Moroccan rugs

Moroccan rugs have become super popular in the past year. Not all hand made Moroccan rugs will fit in with tribal decor, but this one will:

Moroccan Rug

Moroccan Rug found on Etsy Shop it Now >

This rug was found on Etsy in a shop called antevarsin. The abstract design complemented by splashes of bright blue, green and yellow colors make this rug a striking work of art.

 

5. Certain types of Hamadan rugs

Last on our list is the Persian Hamadan rug. When you think of a Persian Hamadan what probably comes to mind is a medium-sized rug with a red field and an ivory center medallion. Obviously those Hamadan rugs would not complement tribal decor, but the word Hamadan describes a massive region of Persia and not all Hamadans are the same. Below are two great examples of antique Hamadan rugs with tribal designs.

Antique Persian Rug

Antique worn Hamadan Persian rug with abstract tree of life. Shop Now >

This Hamadan was made circa 1920. The design features an abstract tree of life set in a natural beige field. The Hamadan below was made slightly later in the 30’s. This design features five red and blue medallions set in a dark blue field. The outermost border is similar in color to the natural beige in the Hamadan above. Each color was used skillfully in this Hamadan to complement the tribal pattern.

Antique Persian Hamadan rug

Antique Persian Hamadan Rug with five fantastic center medallions. Shop now >

 

These are not the only types of Oriental rugs which will complement tribal decor, but they are some of the best. Looking for an authentic Oriental rug? Shop our discount Oriental rugs at JessiesRugs.com.

Share your favorite tribal rug in the comments below!