Tag Archives: antique rugs

Great Buys Under $150

We have been adding a bunch of vintage and antique Oriental rugs to our inventory. If you are looking to add a fresh look to your home with a Persian rug and you are on a tight budget, you have come to the right place.

red persian rug

Red Persian Hamedan rug $140 Shop Now >

Hamedan rugs are one of the most common types of Persian rugs. To learn more about this type of rug check out our Hamedan rug Guide.

red persian rug with geometric design

Persian Karaja rug $140, Shop Now >

Karaja rugs are also a type of Persian rug. These rugs generally have a more tribal look than Hamedan rugs, but can be found in similar colors like the one represented above. Many Karaja rugs feature a trio of recognizable medallions similar to the medallions above.

Red Oriental rug

Pakistan Bokhara rug $132, Shop Now >

Bokhara rugs, like the one pictured above, are often the easiest type of Oriental rug to identify for beginners. This is due to the gul medallion design seen in the field above. The larger the Bokhara rug, the more rows of guls it will have. These Pakistan Bokhara rugs are very popular as they come in all different sizes and colors making them easy to decorate with. Learn more about these rugs with our Guide to Bokhara rugs.

If you are looking for a larger size, you can find all of our rugs at JessiesRugs.com

March Rug Highlights

Saint Patrick’s Day is one of my favorite holidays. From green beer to leprechauns and Boiled Dinner it’s a day I look forward to every year. Therefore green is the color of the day today, but as I have mentioned in a previous post on Green Dyes one rarely finds this color in very old, antique Persian rugs. I have rounded up a few of the Oriental rugs we have in stock right now that feature either green fields or green highlights.

art deco rug

Art Deco Circular Chinese Oriental rug with a green field and pink border

The Chinese rug above features a soft green field sharply contrasted by a bright pink border, typical of this type of art deco-style Oriental rug.

Persian Rug

Silk Persian Tabriz rug with mint green field that has slight yellow undertones

The elaborate vase and floral design in the prayer rug above is accented by a soft mint green field allowing the highlight colors to shine.

Turkish Rug

Stunning Tribal Turkish Kazak rug with three vertical medallions set in a rich, dark green field

Bold contrasting colors of green, blue and rust red complement the strong geometric design found in this Turkish Kazak rug.

Persian Mashad rug

Intricately woven Persian Mashad rug with subtle green highlights set in a purple field

The Persian Mashad pictured above pulls together a variety of colors and intricate designs without appearing gaudy. If you look closely you will find a luscious shade of green in the floral and leaf motifs.

Persian rug with mint green

Persian Ardebil rug with central medallions set in an ivory field with mint green highlights and minor border

Lastly, we have a classic vintage Persian Ardebil with exciting abstract designs set in an ivory field. The minor borders are a soft shade of mint green reminiscent of mint chocolate chip ice cream.

Check out some of the other rugs we have for sale at JessiesRugs.com and I hope good fortune finds you on this lucky day!

Modern, Antique & Vintage Rugs

One of the easier characteristics to identify of an Oriental rug is often the age. Of course there are variables that may cause premature wear or color fading in a newer rug causing it to appear older, but for the most part rugs can be split into different categories by age.

Modern or contemporary rugs are those rugs woven in the last 20 years or so. Quality varies depending on origin, however when compared with a rug woven 40+ years ago it is easy to tell the difference. There is one complication when dealing with modern rugs. When some rug dealers discovered the market for antique rugs, they wanted to appeal to decorators and designers by wearing down the pile of their freshly woven rugs. The wear gives the appearance of an antique rug, however these rugs are not antique. After practicing, it should be relatively easy to determine whether a rug is antique or new by inspecting the weave. The rug pictured below is a contemporary Indian scatter rug.

Oriental rug

Red Oriental Rug

Indian Rug

Weave of an Oriental rug

Sometimes customers confuse the terms antique and vintage. An item is typically classified as antique if it was made 100 or more years ago, while a semi antique object would be around 50-100 years old. The terms semi antique and vintage are often used interchangeably. Vintage can describe an item over around 40 years old, but it can also describe a specific period in time. The rug pictured below is a vintage Persian Karaja rug.

Persian Karaja rug

Vintage Persian Karaja

Note the differences between the vintage Persian rug above and the first contemporary Indian rug pictured before it.

For further comparison, note the fine weave of the antique Persian Kirman below. Although many antique rugs are worn due to traffic wear and use, there are some which are preserved either from being hung on a wall or not laid on the floor. Therefore, if you come across a rug without wear it doesn’t necessarily mean it is not antique. Many professionals often have their antique rugs restored, making them appear as though they have just come off the loom.

Persian rug

Weave of an Antique Persian Kirman rug

Antique Persian Rug

Antique Persian Kirman rug

Do you like antique rugs, or modern rugs? Personally, I like them all.

Find these rugs and more at JessiesRugs.com

4 Best Sites To Follow About Rugs

If you are just getting started in the world of Oriental rugs, there are some really great sites to check out with guides and facts about antique rugs. Below are some of the top sites I follow for Oriental rug news and information.

persian rug

Antique Persian Rug

1. One of the most thorough sites on the web to learn about Oriental rugs is JBOC’s Notes on Oriental rugs. Here you will find a surplus of information on almost every single type of Oriental rug you could imagine as well as many photograph examples of each rug type.

2. Hali is a well-known textile and Oriental rug magazine featuring up to date articles on what is going on in the rug industry. At Hali.com you can find out about current events and exhibitions at museums in your area as well as famous auctions with Oriental rugs for sale.

3. Jozan, like Hali, is another Oriental rug magazine. They feature a variety of educational materials with many rug photos and also highlight current happenings in the world of rugs.

4. Last, I will mention our site, JessiesRugs.com where you can find a variety of DIY guides and informational materials on types of Oriental rugs including “How to Hand Wash an Oriental rug” and “A Guide to Oriental Rug Motifs”

Although there are plenty of sites online for educational rug guides, I would also advise stopping by your local library to see if they have any books on rugs. Sometime in the near future I will highlight some of my favorite Oriental rug books.

What to do With Worn Out Rugs

When Your Rug Is Ready to Retire

Handmade Oriental rugs are well-known to be long-wearing and durable, but eventually the pile will wear down, the colors may fade, moths may get at the edges under furniture and ends might start unraveling. Well, all hope is not lost and you do not have to throw your prized carpet and family heirloom into the dumpster. From pillows to wall hangings there are many options for your antique Oriental rugs.

1. Make Pillows

We recently got two beautiful pillows made from an antique Persian rug and an antique Caucasian rug. This is one of my favorite uses of worn antique Oriental rugs. You can either do this yourself if you’ve made pillows before, or you can take your rug to a local rug repair-person who may be able to do it or will recommend someone.

Rug Pillow

Antique Persian Rug Pillow

2. Hang it up

When your rug has had too much traffic and becomes a tripping hazard on your floor, hang it up! Check out our How to Hang a Rug guide if it’s your first time or if you need to refresh your memory. Rugs on a wall make a stunning addition and conversation piece to neutral spaces.

Persian Rug

Semi-Antique Persian Lilihan rug hanging on a wall

3. Frame fragments

Recently I saw a collection of framed scrap pieces of wallpaper. Rather than wallpaper you could use rug fragments for a textured feel.

4. Use it as a coffee or side table cover if it is thin

If your rug has worn down or is thin enough like an antique Caucasian rug, you can use it as a coffee table runner or cut it down to fit a side table under a lamp.

 

What do you do with your old rugs?

Oriental Rug Designs by Type

When shopping for an Oriental rug, all of the available colors and patterns can get overwhelming. Below I will outline some of the basic designs found in different types of Oriental rugs to help you decide which rug will be a good fit for your home.

Persian rugs have the most design variety. Some of these include a single medallion set in a solid colored field, an all-over design such as the Herati pattern, a tribal pattern with geometric shapes, or an all-over floral pattern.

Turkish rugs are often associated with tribal patterns, but they also come in all-over patterns with palmette motifs such as the rug seen below.

Bokhara rugs are the most easily identifiable Oriental rug with distinct gul medallions like the rug pictured below. These come in almost every color of the rainbow and are very easy to decorate with.

Bokhara rug

Traditional gul medallions in a Bokhara rug with an orange field

Caucasian rugs are often one of the most desirable rug types. With tribal designs and geometric patterns paired with bold color palettes, these add a touch of character to every room.

Antique Caucasian rug

Antique Caucasian Kuba rug with all-over pattern

Jessie’s Oriental rugs carries many types of discount Oriental rugs, check out some of the antique rugs in the shop today.

Oriental Rugs in Contemporary Rooms

For many years Oriental rugs were associated with estate cleanouts, flea markets, or your grandparents’ living room. If you inherited one, you may have thrown it in a stuffy attic, or put it in storage knowing the value of the rug in the back of your mind but not having any place to put it.

Persian rug

Semi-antique Persian Hamedan rug with all-over design.

Lately, however, the rug market has been making a comeback. With the embargo on goods made in Iran being lifted in the near future, people in the United States are eagerly awaiting newly handmade authentic Persian rugs to come back into the rug market.

Designers and everyday decorators are beginning to see the benefits of decorating with authentic Oriental rugs. Not only do Oriental rugs hold their value over time, but they wear much better than machine made rugs. Whether it’s a cold winter in New England or some place warmer, Oriental rugs stand the test of time.

The Washington Post recently did a piece on the comeback of Oriental rugs and the September Issue of House Beautiful magazine which features a stunning vintage Persian Bakhtiari rug with a traditional garden design in a contemporary living room. As rug lovers, it is exciting to see people developing the same passion Mike and I have for these pieces of art.

Not only are handmade Oriental rugs durable, but they fit perfectly in contemporary spaces. With bold colors and a variety of designs Persian rugs are the perfect choice for decorating, and when you purchase a vintage or antique rug you are making a green choice. Whether you are going with a rustic theme and looking for a rug with a little wear like the rug below, or a contemporary theme and need something like the Bokhara rug in the second photo, JessiesRugs.com has you covered.

Rustic Persian rug

Neutral toned Persian Hamedan rug with three center medallions

Bokhara rug

Contemporary style Pakistan Bokhara rug.

Why Does a Rug Crack?

If you have an antique Persian Sarouk at home or have been collecting authentic Oriental rugs for a while, you probably have heard the term “cracking.” You may not even realize your rug has cracks, however depending on the extent of the cracking, repairs can become costly and even impossible.

persian rug

A large crack in the field of an antique Persian Sarouk rug

The cracking occurs from dry rot in the foundation of the rug. It may be from a simple case of the rug being exposed to humid conditions and accumulating moisture over time or from a more severe case such as a potted plant leaking water onto the rug. I have seen a thousand dollar rug thrown in the garbage after discovering dry rot throughout the foundation. The foundation threads which form the base of the rug will break apart easily and over time if the rot is severe the rug can literally fall apart.

Persian rug

Several cracks on the edge of an antique Persian Sarouk rug

Antique Persian Sarouk rugs are well-known to have issues with cracking. As rugs age they are also prone to weakness in the foundation which contributes to cracks. Unfortunately if you discover cracks in your rug, the only option is to have them repaired. It is best to be proactive with your Oriental rugs and inspect them for any discoloration which may be a sign of growing mold or mildew. In this case a professional rug cleaning is advised to remove the mold before it begins to rot the rug. Also, be sure to clean up any pet accidents as soon as they happen and have your rug cleaned as urine can also cause rot to occur in rugs. Make sure when you water your plants, none of that water is seeping through into your expensive Persian rug.

How to Combine More Than One Rug in a Space

Not all of us are professional designers, and sometimes it’s difficult to determine whether two rugs are a good match for a specific space or theme.

Caucasian Kazak rug

There are a variety of ways to combine more than one rug in a space. Some characteristics to consider include texture (is the rug wool, silk or camel/goat hair), color, pattern (geometric, floral, traditional, tribal), age (vintage, antique, modern), and origin (where was the rug made?).

As a beginner, it is a good idea to combine “like with like”. If you are looking to create a space with antique items, you may want to incorporate worn rugs. Combining worn rugs with new, full-piled rugs can get confusing if you are just starting out. Another helpful hint is to utilize rugs that originate in the same region. For example, these two rugs were made in Persia (Iran):

Antique Persian Rug

Persian Hamedan rug Shop Now >

Persian rug runner

Antique Persian Kurdistan rug runner Shop Now >

If you are a stickler for uniformity, you may want to delve deeper and choose rugs from the same province. These two Persian rugs are from the Hamedan region of Iran.

Red Persian Rug

Dergazine Red Persian Rug Shop Now >

 

Red Persian Rug

Red Persian Dergazine Rug Shop Now >

It is also possible to combine rugs from different regions that have similar features. For example, the rugs below both have a tribal look and feel as they are both all wool. They also have similar ages.

Caucasian Kazak rug

Caucasian Kazak rug Shop Now >

Persian Bagface

Persian Bagface Shop Now >

 

What rug decorating themes do you have in your house?

Picking Up Rugs

This past weekend we picked up a bunch of vintage and antique Oriental rugs for the shop. After cleaning them we will start putting them online, so keep an eye on JessiesRugs.com

Antique oriental rugs

Vintage and antique Oriental rugs

 

Soumak rug

Close-up of a Soumak rug

Above is a sneak peak at one of my favorite rugs we just got in. There are numerous types of animal motifs woven into this rug including, but not limited to, birds, cats, bulls and fish.

Persian rugs

Drying two Persian mats

This nice weather has really been helping us out! The sun does a great job drying freshly washed Oriental rugs like the ones pictured above.