Tag Archives: antique oriental rugs

Great Buys Under $150

We have been adding a bunch of vintage and antique Oriental rugs to our inventory. If you are looking to add a fresh look to your home with a Persian rug and you are on a tight budget, you have come to the right place.

red persian rug

Red Persian Hamedan rug $140 Shop Now >

Hamedan rugs are one of the most common types of Persian rugs. To learn more about this type of rug check out our Hamedan rug Guide.

red persian rug with geometric design

Persian Karaja rug $140, Shop Now >

Karaja rugs are also a type of Persian rug. These rugs generally have a more tribal look than Hamedan rugs, but can be found in similar colors like the one represented above. Many Karaja rugs feature a trio of recognizable medallions similar to the medallions above.

Red Oriental rug

Pakistan Bokhara rug $132, Shop Now >

Bokhara rugs, like the one pictured above, are often the easiest type of Oriental rug to identify for beginners. This is due to the gul medallion design seen in the field above. The larger the Bokhara rug, the more rows of guls it will have. These Pakistan Bokhara rugs are very popular as they come in all different sizes and colors making them easy to decorate with. Learn more about these rugs with our Guide to Bokhara rugs.

If you are looking for a larger size, you can find all of our rugs at JessiesRugs.com

4 Best Sites To Follow About Rugs

If you are just getting started in the world of Oriental rugs, there are some really great sites to check out with guides and facts about antique rugs. Below are some of the top sites I follow for Oriental rug news and information.

persian rug

Antique Persian Rug

1. One of the most thorough sites on the web to learn about Oriental rugs is JBOC’s Notes on Oriental rugs. Here you will find a surplus of information on almost every single type of Oriental rug you could imagine as well as many photograph examples of each rug type.

2. Hali is a well-known textile and Oriental rug magazine featuring up to date articles on what is going on in the rug industry. At Hali.com you can find out about current events and exhibitions at museums in your area as well as famous auctions with Oriental rugs for sale.

3. Jozan, like Hali, is another Oriental rug magazine. They feature a variety of educational materials with many rug photos and also highlight current happenings in the world of rugs.

4. Last, I will mention our site, JessiesRugs.com where you can find a variety of DIY guides and informational materials on types of Oriental rugs including “How to Hand Wash an Oriental rug” and “A Guide to Oriental Rug Motifs”

Although there are plenty of sites online for educational rug guides, I would also advise stopping by your local library to see if they have any books on rugs. Sometime in the near future I will highlight some of my favorite Oriental rug books.

Persian Karaja Rugs

Persian Karaja rugs (also spelled Karadagh Gharadjeh) are woven in the Northwestern region of Iran near Tabriz. These rugs have a very similar weave and character to Heriz rugs which are also woven nearby. They are woven with single wefts, and Turkish knots similar to those woven in the Hamedan province. For that reason they are sometimes mistaken for Persian Kurdistan rugs.

Persian Karaja rug

Persian Karaja Rug with typical geometric motifs and medallions

Most Karaja rugs are easily distinguishable by their design which often consists of vertical Heriz-style medallions. We recently added several Karaja rugs to our shop which can be seen below. Reds, Blues, Ivory, Rust and Orange are common color schemes found in Karaja rugs. Karaja rugs are quite popular for their bold designs and tribal nature.

Red Persian rug

Red Field Persian Karaja rug with three vertical medallions

Karaja rug medallion

Persian Karaja medallion in semi-antique rug

Persian Karaja rug runner

Same Karaja medallion woven in a newer Persian Karaja rug c. 1970. Interesting animal figures found in the field include deer and birds.

Shop our selection of Karaja rugs and other antique Oriental rugs>

For more info on Karaja rugs and the different types of Karajas, check out this guide>

Oriental Rug Designs by Type

When shopping for an Oriental rug, all of the available colors and patterns can get overwhelming. Below I will outline some of the basic designs found in different types of Oriental rugs to help you decide which rug will be a good fit for your home.

Persian rugs have the most design variety. Some of these include a single medallion set in a solid colored field, an all-over design such as the Herati pattern, a tribal pattern with geometric shapes, or an all-over floral pattern.

Turkish rugs are often associated with tribal patterns, but they also come in all-over patterns with palmette motifs such as the rug seen below.

Bokhara rugs are the most easily identifiable Oriental rug with distinct gul medallions like the rug pictured below. These come in almost every color of the rainbow and are very easy to decorate with.

Bokhara rug

Traditional gul medallions in a Bokhara rug with an orange field

Caucasian rugs are often one of the most desirable rug types. With tribal designs and geometric patterns paired with bold color palettes, these add a touch of character to every room.

Antique Caucasian rug

Antique Caucasian Kuba rug with all-over pattern

Jessie’s Oriental rugs carries many types of discount Oriental rugs, check out some of the antique rugs in the shop today.

Oriental Rugs in Contemporary Rooms

For many years Oriental rugs were associated with estate cleanouts, flea markets, or your grandparents’ living room. If you inherited one, you may have thrown it in a stuffy attic, or put it in storage knowing the value of the rug in the back of your mind but not having any place to put it.

Persian rug

Semi-antique Persian Hamedan rug with all-over design.

Lately, however, the rug market has been making a comeback. With the embargo on goods made in Iran being lifted in the near future, people in the United States are eagerly awaiting newly handmade authentic Persian rugs to come back into the rug market.

Designers and everyday decorators are beginning to see the benefits of decorating with authentic Oriental rugs. Not only do Oriental rugs hold their value over time, but they wear much better than machine made rugs. Whether it’s a cold winter in New England or some place warmer, Oriental rugs stand the test of time.

The Washington Post recently did a piece on the comeback of Oriental rugs and the September Issue of House Beautiful magazine which features a stunning vintage Persian Bakhtiari rug with a traditional garden design in a contemporary living room. As rug lovers, it is exciting to see people developing the same passion Mike and I have for these pieces of art.

Not only are handmade Oriental rugs durable, but they fit perfectly in contemporary spaces. With bold colors and a variety of designs Persian rugs are the perfect choice for decorating, and when you purchase a vintage or antique rug you are making a green choice. Whether you are going with a rustic theme and looking for a rug with a little wear like the rug below, or a contemporary theme and need something like the Bokhara rug in the second photo, JessiesRugs.com has you covered.

Rustic Persian rug

Neutral toned Persian Hamedan rug with three center medallions

Bokhara rug

Contemporary style Pakistan Bokhara rug.

How to Combine More Than One Rug in a Space

Not all of us are professional designers, and sometimes it’s difficult to determine whether two rugs are a good match for a specific space or theme.

Caucasian Kazak rug

There are a variety of ways to combine more than one rug in a space. Some characteristics to consider include texture (is the rug wool, silk or camel/goat hair), color, pattern (geometric, floral, traditional, tribal), age (vintage, antique, modern), and origin (where was the rug made?).

As a beginner, it is a good idea to combine “like with like”. If you are looking to create a space with antique items, you may want to incorporate worn rugs. Combining worn rugs with new, full-piled rugs can get confusing if you are just starting out. Another helpful hint is to utilize rugs that originate in the same region. For example, these two rugs were made in Persia (Iran):

Antique Persian Rug

Persian Hamedan rug Shop Now >

Persian rug runner

Antique Persian Kurdistan rug runner Shop Now >

If you are a stickler for uniformity, you may want to delve deeper and choose rugs from the same province. These two Persian rugs are from the Hamedan region of Iran.

Red Persian Rug

Dergazine Red Persian Rug Shop Now >

 

Red Persian Rug

Red Persian Dergazine Rug Shop Now >

It is also possible to combine rugs from different regions that have similar features. For example, the rugs below both have a tribal look and feel as they are both all wool. They also have similar ages.

Caucasian Kazak rug

Caucasian Kazak rug Shop Now >

Persian Bagface

Persian Bagface Shop Now >

 

What rug decorating themes do you have in your house?

Picking Up Rugs

This past weekend we picked up a bunch of vintage and antique Oriental rugs for the shop. After cleaning them we will start putting them online, so keep an eye on JessiesRugs.com

Antique oriental rugs

Vintage and antique Oriental rugs

 

Soumak rug

Close-up of a Soumak rug

Above is a sneak peak at one of my favorite rugs we just got in. There are numerous types of animal motifs woven into this rug including, but not limited to, birds, cats, bulls and fish.

Persian rugs

Drying two Persian mats

This nice weather has really been helping us out! The sun does a great job drying freshly washed Oriental rugs like the ones pictured above.

 

Unsymmetrical Rugs: Imperfections in Authentic Oriental Rugs

If you are looking for a perfect, symmetrical, uniform-looking rug you should probably check out machine made rugs. A while ago, someone asked me why her Persian rug looked different from one end to the other. Like anything else made by hand, there will be imperfections in authentic Oriental rugs. Granted, some of those imperfections may be intentional, and some may be more pronounced than others.

Machine Made Oriental Rug

A Machine Made rug with an Oriental rug design.

Tribal rugs woven on horizontal looms in village settings are more likely to have imperfections than those woven on vertical looms in the cities or workshops where weavers strive for perfection.

red persian rug

Persian Joshaghan rug Shop Now >

Above is a hand knotted Persian Joshaghan rug. Note how the sides of the rug are not perfectly straight and the design is not completely uniform. For many customers and rug lovers these are the characteristics which drive the sale of the rug. Each imperfection adds to the one of a kind nature of an antique Oriental rug such as this.

One of the most common occurrences of “flaws” in authentic Oriental rugs is abrash. Abrash is a term used quite often in describing the characteristics of a rug. It refers to a change in the tone of the color of the wool in a specific area of the rug. For example, a field may be dark blue with a thick line of lighter blue running horizontally across it. It is easy to confuse abrash with fading. Fading is a result of long-term exposure of a rug to the sun, and some fading can occur due to wear depending on the dyes used in the rug.

persian rug runner

Abrash in a Persian rug runner Shop Now >

The rug pictured above has notable abrash at one end. Note how the band runs horizontally along the same path a weaver would be tying the knots onto the foundation. This type of variation in color would not be called fading because fading is uneven and it would be very difficult to achieve this look after completion. Abrash occurs when the weaver changes wool lots, most often because the last lot has run out, and the next lot of wool may be lighter, or darker due to any number of variables including the dye time, temperature, and type of mordant among others.

Another common flaw in Oriental rugs is white knots appearing in the field, especially after the rug has seen some traffic. These knots are the tail ends of the foundation as seen below.

Turkish sparta rug

Knot tails in a Turkish Sparta rug

 

What type of unique imperfection does your Oriental rug have?

Green Dyes in Oriental Rugs

Before synthetic dyes were introduced in the late 1800’s, Oriental rugs were dyed with colors extracted from the surrounding environment including plants, minerals and even insects. These dyes are usually called vegetable dyes. At an early age people are taught mixing yellow and blue makes green. This well-known fact was also applied to antique Oriental rugs made with vegetable dyes.

Green Oriental rug

Indian Oriental rug with a green field

The color blue was obtained from the indigo plant. After dyeing the wool blue, it was dyed yellow. Yellow dye was often obtained from various flowers including Saffron, Larkspur, vine leaves, and buckthorn. It is easy to differentiate a green in a vegetable dyed rug versus a synthetic dyed rug by the uneven color in the vegetable dyed rug. Since the wool has been dyed twice the green color in a vegetable dyed rug may have a slightly blue hue in one area and a yellow hue in the other. The synthetic green will be more uniform. Often times, the yellow may fade leaving blue on the pile. If you gently pull the pile apart to an area which has not been exposed to sunlight you will see the color was once green. Yellow splotches may also appear in a vegetable dyed rug from wear which causes the indigo color to rub off over time. Other, less common, sources of green dyes include turmeric berries, and Buckthorn berries which are used to produce Chinese green. In China, the color green signifies renewal and growth.

Chinese Oriental rug

Green and yellow butterfly in a Chinese Oriental rug.

The strength of the color is determined by several variables including the time the yarn spends in the dye pot, the type of spring water used, and the type of mordant used. Green fields are very rare in antique Oriental rugs because green is a holy color in Islam and is rarely walked upon. Since saffron is so expensive and yellow dye is required to make green, the rarity of yellow can also contribute to the lack of green rugs. Green has become more common in Oriental rugs in the last 100 years or so with the introduction of synthetic dyes and the increasing demand for it.

Shop Green Oriental Rugs >

Other Oriental rug dyeing resources:

http://www.turkotek.com/journal/pdyes.html

http://www.nhrugs.com/vegetable%20dyes.html

http://www.richardrothstein.com/oriental-rug-questions.html

 

Decorating with Room-size Rugs

Everyone’s favorite rug tip when decorating is to put your Oriental rug down first. It is much easier to base the rest of your decor on the colors and patterns in your antique rug. An authentic Oriental rug is a one-of-a-kind piece, and often an investment. Wallpaper, art, paint, furniture and antiques come in all different shapes, sizes, patterns and colors so it is much easier to find a rug you love and work around it rather than working backwards.

 

White Persian Rug

Traditional Ivory Persian Kapoutrang rug c. 1940 Shop now>

If you have very traditional taste in rugs such as a large red rug with a blue border and an ivory center medallion, your journey will be much easier. However if you are looking for a large antique rug with an all-over pattern, a navy field and hot purple highlights you may be looking for a longer time. It is important to have an idea of what characteristics you are looking for in a rug, often times the old saying “when you see it you’ll know it”  holds true and a light will turn on when you find your dream rug.

Art deco chinese rug

Gorgeous Art Deco style Chinese rug, shop it now>

When decorating with a room-size Oriental rug you generally want the rug to ground the furniture in the space. This method ties each component together to form a cohesive space. Keep in mind you want about 18 inches of floor visible around the rug itself unless you are working with a smaller area such as a bathroom or foyer in which case less is better. There is no right or wrong way to place the furniture on the carpet, everyone is different. Options include having all of the furniture on the rug, the front legs of the furniture on the rug, none of the furniture on the rug (if you are looking at a smaller size rug such as 5×8) and more.

Shop our selection of room-size rugs >

How do you decorate with Oriental rugs? Do you put your rug down first or last?