Author Archives: Jessica

Tips For the Entry Level Rug Collector

Every Oriental rug connoisseur and professional had to start somewhere. When you are just starting to get your feet wet in the world of Oriental rugs all of the different names and styles can get quite overwhelming, especially if you are not yet able to tell the difference between a machine made rug and a hand-knotted rug.

Oriental Rug

One of my favorite Oriental rug finds, the colors brightened so much after Mike washed it!

When Mike and I first started out we made quite a few impulse buys that did not turn out quite as planned. The beginners eye is not yet trained to the characteristics of a hand-knotted rug compared to those of a machine loomed rug. Even when shopping at a reputable rug dealers store you should have a rough idea of what exactly you are looking for so that you don’t end up over-paying.

Below is a list of tips and tricks that helped give me the education and confidence in dealing with handmade Oriental rugs.

  1. Utilize the web. There is so much information on the internet nowadays it is unbelievable how much knowledge is accessible through google. Not all of the information on Oriental rugs is accurate, to save you some time here are some valuable resources that I have found to be helpful over the years:
    1. http://www.spongobongo.com/ This one is like the encyclopedia of Oriental rugs. If you are trying to figure out whether you have a Caucasian Kazak or a Turkish Melas, this site has almost everything you need to identify and learn about all the different rug types.
    2. http://www.rugrag.com/ Rug Rag is a great tool for dealers and beginners, especially their forums section. There you can upload photos of rugs you might be interested in and get expert opinions on their worth and what they are.
    3. https://jessiesrugs.com/content/16-oriental-rug-guides Lastly, I would be remiss if I didn’t recommend our rug guide section. Over the years we have composed a variety of guides including caring for your rugs and identifying authentic Oriental rugs.
  2. Haggle. When I was little my grandfather used to take me to flea markets where he would make offers and haggle with sellers to get the best deal. Who doesn’t like to save a few bucks? Honestly there have been a few times that I have felt uncomfortable negotiating on a price, but you will never know if you don’t try and what do you have to lose?

    Caucasian Lesghi rug

    A stunning Caucasian rug

  3. Inspect, Inspect, Inspect. One of the worse possible experiences you can have when buying antique or vintage rugs is odors. Mike and I have become extremely talented at removing stains and professionally washing the antique rugs we get in our shop. That’s not to say we didn’t have our fair share of mistakes. In the beginning we overpaid quite a few times for rugs that had moth damage (easy to spot when you know what to look for), dry rot (also easy to spot), and odors. Never feel uncomfortable smelling a rug, especially when you are the one shelling out the money for it and it will be sitting on your living room floor.
  4. Let someone in on your knowledge. They say mastering a subject is easier when you are able to teach someone else about it. Luckily for me the subject of Oriental rugs was fascinating to my family. Everyone wanted to know how we knew what to look for and what to stay away from. If you can find someone who is interested in learning about Oriental rugs you will find sharing your experience and ideas will only add to your confidence.

    Oriental rugs for sale

    You never know what kind of deals you may find…

  5. Don’t get overwhelmed. It is very easy to be taken advantage of when you don’t have a lot of experience with dealers. They want you to buy their rugs, but it is your responsibility to make sure you are getting the best deal. Not every dealer is out to get you, but you have to be careful and complete your research before making a purchase, never feel rushed into making an impulsive buy.

 

Top 5 Rugs for Bohemian Decorating at JessiesRugs.com

Below are 5 rugs currently offered at JessiesRugs.com that are perfect for adding a piece of energetic flare to your decorating space.

Antique Caucasian Rug

4′ 8 x 6′ Antique Caucasian rug Shop Now >

For a medium sized space our 4′ 8 x 6′ Antique Caucasian rug would be a perfect fit. When I first saw this rug I fell in love with the unique pink and baby blue highlights. This rug has the perfect amount of wear, and a bold all-over pattern to drive home that energetic look of a Bohemian space.

Persian Rug Runner

3′ 8 x 9′ Persian Kurdistan Rug Runner Shop Now >

When you are trying to finish off a long space such as a hallway or narrow room, this 3′ 8 x 9′ Persian Kurdistan rug could be just the piece you have been looking for. With long, narrow medallions set in a bold salmon colored field this runner will accentuate any tribal or boho space.

Persian Shiraz Rug

Small Persian Shiraz Rug Shop Now >

This 2′ 6 x 4′ 3 Persian Shiraz rug has the most beautiful bright blue highlights. With an eye-catching design and a soft wool pile to sink your feet into this rug is perfect for a small space like in front of the kitchen sink.

Antique Caucasian Rug

2′ 10 x 4′ 3 Antique Caucasian Lesghi rug Shop Now >

Or, you can capture an antique look balanced with tribal style with this stunning 2′ 10 x 4′ 3 Caucasian Lesghi rug. Traditional antique Lesghi rugs are enormously popular among rug collectors. This bold and energetic pattern will be a riveting addition to any space.

Turkish Sparta rug

3′ 2 x 6′ 6 Turkish Sparta rug Shop Now >

Lastly, we have our 3′ 2 x 6′ 6 Purple Turkish Sparta rug. Featuring a bold geometric design with interesting animal figures scattered throughout, this rug will liven up any room.

Whether you are looking for tribal-style rugs, elegant traditional Persian rugs or something in between, browse JessiesRugs.com to find the perfect one of a kind rug to fit your space. If we don’t have exactly what you’re looking for be sure to send us a note and we will keep an eye out for you as our inventory is constantly changing.

Soft Red Oriental Rug

Deals on Room-Size Rugs

Because we are beginning to focus on selling rugs smaller than 9×12 we are running a great sale on all of our room-sized rugs. Marked down from already low prices, now is the time to buy if you have been waiting for the perfect extra-large sized rug in our shop. Below are some of our large rugs on sale right now:

Persian Kapoutrang Rug

7′ 11 x 10′ 7 including fringe, beautiful Ivory and Red Persian Kapoutrang Rug, only $612. with Free Shipping! Shop Now >

Above is a traditional vintage Ivory Persian Kapoutrang rug. Check out our rug guide to learn more about Kapoutrang rugs. If you are looking for something a bit larger, find a bold red and green Persian Tabriz below. This one features an all-over pattern highlighted with floral elements, palmettes, deer and bird motifs.

Red Persian Rug

9′ 7 x 13′ 3, this large Persian rug will add character to any space. A soft wool pile will feel warm and welcoming underfoot, while you admire the interesting details of this Persian rug. Marked down to $1067.60  Shop Now >

If you are looking for a larger rug and trying to keep your budget under $1000, find a great deal on a soft red Persian Mashad rug below.

Soft Red Oriental Rug

9′ 5 x 13′ 5 Persian Mashad with a bold center medallion surrounded by all-over patterns set in a soft red field. Only $979.20 Shop Now>

Browse all of our discounted room-sized Oriental rugs here >

 

Great Buys Under $150

We have been adding a bunch of vintage and antique Oriental rugs to our inventory. If you are looking to add a fresh look to your home with a Persian rug and you are on a tight budget, you have come to the right place.

red persian rug

Red Persian Hamedan rug $140 Shop Now >

Hamedan rugs are one of the most common types of Persian rugs. To learn more about this type of rug check out our Hamedan rug Guide.

red persian rug with geometric design

Persian Karaja rug $140, Shop Now >

Karaja rugs are also a type of Persian rug. These rugs generally have a more tribal look than Hamedan rugs, but can be found in similar colors like the one represented above. Many Karaja rugs feature a trio of recognizable medallions similar to the medallions above.

Red Oriental rug

Pakistan Bokhara rug $132, Shop Now >

Bokhara rugs, like the one pictured above, are often the easiest type of Oriental rug to identify for beginners. This is due to the gul medallion design seen in the field above. The larger the Bokhara rug, the more rows of guls it will have. These Pakistan Bokhara rugs are very popular as they come in all different sizes and colors making them easy to decorate with. Learn more about these rugs with our Guide to Bokhara rugs.

If you are looking for a larger size, you can find all of our rugs at JessiesRugs.com

March Rug Highlights

Saint Patrick’s Day is one of my favorite holidays. From green beer to leprechauns and Boiled Dinner it’s a day I look forward to every year. Therefore green is the color of the day today, but as I have mentioned in a previous post on Green Dyes one rarely finds this color in very old, antique Persian rugs. I have rounded up a few of the Oriental rugs we have in stock right now that feature either green fields or green highlights.

art deco rug

Art Deco Circular Chinese Oriental rug with a green field and pink border

The Chinese rug above features a soft green field sharply contrasted by a bright pink border, typical of this type of art deco-style Oriental rug.

Persian Rug

Silk Persian Tabriz rug with mint green field that has slight yellow undertones

The elaborate vase and floral design in the prayer rug above is accented by a soft mint green field allowing the highlight colors to shine.

Turkish Rug

Stunning Tribal Turkish Kazak rug with three vertical medallions set in a rich, dark green field

Bold contrasting colors of green, blue and rust red complement the strong geometric design found in this Turkish Kazak rug.

Persian Mashad rug

Intricately woven Persian Mashad rug with subtle green highlights set in a purple field

The Persian Mashad pictured above pulls together a variety of colors and intricate designs without appearing gaudy. If you look closely you will find a luscious shade of green in the floral and leaf motifs.

Persian rug with mint green

Persian Ardebil rug with central medallions set in an ivory field with mint green highlights and minor border

Lastly, we have a classic vintage Persian Ardebil with exciting abstract designs set in an ivory field. The minor borders are a soft shade of mint green reminiscent of mint chocolate chip ice cream.

Check out some of the other rugs we have for sale at JessiesRugs.com and I hope good fortune finds you on this lucky day!

Oriental Rugs In The Kitchen: Good or Bad Idea?

Putting a mat in the kitchen by the sink is pretty common, but in the last few years Persian and Oriental rugs have been replacing those generic mats in the kitchen. Every one has a different opinion on whether or not you should have an antique or vintage hand knotted rug in your kitchen. A Persian rug will look great almost anywhere you place it, but here are a few tips for those who dare to decorate the floors in their kitchen with Oriental rugs.

Rug Runner

Persian Rug Runner

1. Choose colors wisely: Don’t go with white, or light color schemes if you get messy in the kitchen. Although the rug may look stunning, you don’t want to cook pasta one night and have the red sauce spilled all over your beautiful new rug. The majority of Oriental rugs are forgiving, so if you do spill something on it, quickly follow guidelines to remove the stain or take it to a professional cleaner.

2. Choose an appropriate design: An Oriental rug with an open field may not be the best choice for a kitchen floor. Many Persian rugs have elaborate designs with all-over patterns or intricate medallions. By choosing a rug with a full design any stains on the carpet should be masked by the pattern.

3. Choose a rug with good pile-height: Half the reason most people have for having a mat or rug in the kitchen is to have something comfortable to stand on while cooking or doing dishes versus a hard floor. If this is your reason, make sure you find a good rug pad and/or a rug with thick pile and a lot of life left for support.

4. Follow simple rules for caring for Oriental rugs: See our rug guides for easy methods for caring for your Oriental rugs >

Shop the rugs pictured above and others at JessiesRugs.com

 

Modern, Antique & Vintage Rugs

One of the easier characteristics to identify of an Oriental rug is often the age. Of course there are variables that may cause premature wear or color fading in a newer rug causing it to appear older, but for the most part rugs can be split into different categories by age.

Modern or contemporary rugs are those rugs woven in the last 20 years or so. Quality varies depending on origin, however when compared with a rug woven 40+ years ago it is easy to tell the difference. There is one complication when dealing with modern rugs. When some rug dealers discovered the market for antique rugs, they wanted to appeal to decorators and designers by wearing down the pile of their freshly woven rugs. The wear gives the appearance of an antique rug, however these rugs are not antique. After practicing, it should be relatively easy to determine whether a rug is antique or new by inspecting the weave. The rug pictured below is a contemporary Indian scatter rug.

Oriental rug

Red Oriental Rug

Indian Rug

Weave of an Oriental rug

Sometimes customers confuse the terms antique and vintage. An item is typically classified as antique if it was made 100 or more years ago, while a semi antique object would be around 50-100 years old. The terms semi antique and vintage are often used interchangeably. Vintage can describe an item over around 40 years old, but it can also describe a specific period in time. The rug pictured below is a vintage Persian Karaja rug.

Persian Karaja rug

Vintage Persian Karaja

Note the differences between the vintage Persian rug above and the first contemporary Indian rug pictured before it.

For further comparison, note the fine weave of the antique Persian Kirman below. Although many antique rugs are worn due to traffic wear and use, there are some which are preserved either from being hung on a wall or not laid on the floor. Therefore, if you come across a rug without wear it doesn’t necessarily mean it is not antique. Many professionals often have their antique rugs restored, making them appear as though they have just come off the loom.

Persian rug

Weave of an Antique Persian Kirman rug

Antique Persian Rug

Antique Persian Kirman rug

Do you like antique rugs, or modern rugs? Personally, I like them all.

Find these rugs and more at JessiesRugs.com

How to Take Care of Oriental Rugs

It’s the time of year when boots come out of the closet, salt and sand are spread on the roads and sidewalks, and everyone is trekking ice and dirt into the house. So how do you protect your antique rugs from damage without rolling them up and putting them into storage?

  1. Regular vacuuming. Vacuuming your rugs weekly or more often will help prevent abrasive sand and salt from being embedded underneath the pile of the rug causing premature wear. If you are unsure of the best method of vacuuming your carpet, read our rug guide on vacuuming.Vacuuming rugs
  2. Spare Mats At Entryways. Having a few spare mats around 2′ x 3′ laid out at doors and entrance ways will help remove some of the dirt and water on your guests’ boots.
  3. Rotating. By rotating rugs placed in high-traffic areas or areas in direct sunlight, you allow for an even distribution of wear. Ideally, rugs are not placed in direct sunlight as it may cause fading. Rotating your rugs monthly is a good idea so they don’t end up with an unsightly area of wear from foot traffic.
  4. Common Repairs. Inspecting your rug for damage every once in a while is important. Catching moths early before they eat the wool pile can save you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars. Also, simple repairs such as overcasting to protect the fringe ends from losing knots, or re-binding of edges to secure them will also save your rug.
  5. Professional Cleanings. Whether you have your rugs professionally cleaned or follow this DIY guide, it is important to clean your rugs yearly or every two years depending on traffic. Springtime is often the most popular time to clean rugs after a long winter of grime and dirt.

 

New Year, New Rugs

With a New Year comes new resolutions and often a refreshing change in our home’s decorations. Below are some of the new vintage Persian rugs we have added to our shop in the last couple of weeks, perfect for warming floors and adding a touch of brightness in the coldness of winter.

First up is a beautiful Persian Bidjar rug with jewel tones of aqua and pink-salmon. This lively rug has a super thick pile, perfect for a high-traffic area with a pad underneath. With a fine-weave, this collectible peace will add elegance and brightness to any room. This rug is in line with the traditional design one would expect to see in a Persian rug.

Persian Rug

Small Persian rug

Currently my favorite rug in the shop, below is a stunning antique Persian Kirman rug. It is easy to get lost in the intricate details of this fine piece. From small blue cypress trees to swirling, curvilinear floral motifs, this rug exudes elegance. This Persian Kirman is perfect for an upscale, classy home with muted color tones and just the right amount of wear.

Persian rug

Antique Persian Kirman rug

Persian Kirman rug

Close-up tree motifs in antique Persian Kirman rug

Last, but definitely not least, is this absolutely amazing Persian runner rug. If you are looking to brighten up a dark hallway, this is the rug for you. Jewel-tones of blue and green give highlights to the beautiful red-orange border on this gorgeous antique Persian rug. The all-over design in the field is captivating and will have all your guests raving about your taste in rugs.

Antique Oriental rug

Antique Persian Rug runner

Find these rugs and more at JessiesRugs.com

 

Alphabetical Oriental Rug Term Glossary

For every letter of the alphabet there are many Oriental rug terms, but this time I only selected one for each. Enjoy the list I came up with below!

Abrash: Color variation in a handmade Oriental rug. Abrash is often due to differences in wool quality or dyeing methods.

Border: Oriental rugs may have one or many borders. The border is the design which surrounds the main area of the carpet, similar to a frame of a picture.

Cartoon: A color drawing of a rug on graph paper which is followed by the weavers as a template.

Dyes: Synthetic or Natural dyes are used to color the wool used in weaving an Oriental rug.

Edge: The edge of the rug is typically bound by wool to secure the foundation and knots. The edges may become worn down over time and need to be rebound.

Fringe: The fringe of an Oriental rug is found at each end, and is typically white in color. It is formed from the warp threads of the foundation.

Ground/Field: The ground is the main area of the rug where the principle color and design are located within the borders.

Hamedan: One of the most common types of Persian rug. Comprised of many villages, the region of Hamedan produces a variety of different rugs.  Learn more about Hamedan rugs>

Indigo: Blue dye is obtained from the Indigo plant and also made synthetically.

Jufti: The jufti knot is found as both Persian and Turkish knots, however, rather than wrapping around single foundation threads, the knot wraps around pairs of threads. This speeds up the weaving process but forms a rug of lower quality than those woven with typical knots.

Knots: Knots make the pile in Hand-knotted Oriental rugs. There are several types of knots but the two general types are Persian (asymmetrical) and Turkish (symmetrical).

Loom: A loom is a frame used to weave textiles and rugs.

Medallion: A medallion design is a common pattern found in traditional Oriental rugs. It may be a diamond shape, or it may have floral elements. The most typical design including a medallion features a single medallion in the center of the rug.

Ningxia: Beautiful carpets woven with traditional Chinese motifs and designs in yellow tones.

Overcasting: A method used to secure fringe ends from unraveling due to wear.

Painting: Applying paint to the front of the rug after it has been woven. Washed and painted Sarouks were very common in the mid 20th century. Dealers were often stripping areas of color and re-dyeing or “painting” them with a different color to appeal to the rug market.

Qashqai: A tribal style rug woven in the southwest region of Iran.

Re-weave: A repair type used to fix damaged areas due to moth, or dry rot. The repair person cuts out the damage and uses the appropriate color and design to re-weave the area.

Silk: Silk, like wool, is a material found in some fine carpets. It can be used as the pile, as highlights in the pile, and as the foundation.  There are cheaper copies of fine carpets which use artificial silk.

Tribal rug: A village or nomadic rug woven with bold colors, and strong geometric shapes and designs.

Ushak: A highly desirable antique Turkish rug type with muted color schemes and known for popular styles including the Lotto and Holbein carpets.

Vase Carpet: A popular carpet woven in Kerman, Iran from the 17-18th century featuring floral motifs and curvilinear patterns.

Warp/Weft: The specific foundation threads of a hand-knotted Oriental rug. The warp threads run vertically and the weft threads are horizontal.

Xinjiang: Type of antique Chinese carpet woven with bright, contrasting colors.

Yastik: A very small, usually red, Turkish rug type which is popular among collectors.

Z-Spun: Yarn is either spun in a counter-clockwise (Z) direction or a clockwise (S) direction.

 

Also, check out some of the new authentic Oriental rugs we have been adding daily to our site!