Monthly Archives: April 2015

Picking Up Rugs

This past weekend we picked up a bunch of vintage and antique Oriental rugs for the shop. After cleaning them we will start putting them online, so keep an eye on JessiesRugs.com

Antique oriental rugs

Vintage and antique Oriental rugs

 

Soumak rug

Close-up of a Soumak rug

Above is a sneak peak at one of my favorite rugs we just got in. There are numerous types of animal motifs woven into this rug including, but not limited to, birds, cats, bulls and fish.

Persian rugs

Drying two Persian mats

This nice weather has really been helping us out! The sun does a great job drying freshly washed Oriental rugs like the ones pictured above.

 

Persian Heriz Rugs

For as long as they have been around, Oriental rugs have been looked at as a symbol of wealth and importance. Heriz rugs, which are a type of Persian Oriental rug, have long been a favored sub-type. Found in lawyers offices and in the homes of doctors, Heriz rugs are recognized by many for their durability and striking colors. Even over the past few years they have increased in desirability and popularity.

Persian Heriz rug

Genuine Persian Heriz rug c. 1950 Shop Now>

Dominant colors found in Heriz rugs include red, blue, ivory, green and others. They often have brick or rust red fields. The most common design is a large central medallion with several lobes in contrasting colors. However they may have all-over designs with palmette motifs. They are typically found in large 8×10 to 10×14 room sizes, however they do occur in smaller sizes.

Heriz rugs may be referred to as Bakshaish, Mehraban, Serapi or Gorevan depending on their structure. The Serapi type is the finest and often considered the most desirable of Persian rugs. The Gorevan is the lowest quality Heriz, however it is still a fine and beautiful rug type.

Indian Heriz Rug

Indian Heriz Rug Shop Now>

Copies of Heriz rugs are woven in India and cost much less than real Persian Heriz rugs. When you buy a genuine Oriental rug you will be enjoying it for decades and all who enter your home or office will notice it.

Do you have a Persian Heriz rug at home?

Unsymmetrical Rugs: Imperfections in Authentic Oriental Rugs

If you are looking for a perfect, symmetrical, uniform-looking rug you should probably check out machine made rugs. A while ago, someone asked me why her Persian rug looked different from one end to the other. Like anything else made by hand, there will be imperfections in authentic Oriental rugs. Granted, some of those imperfections may be intentional, and some may be more pronounced than others.

Machine Made Oriental Rug

A Machine Made rug with an Oriental rug design.

Tribal rugs woven on horizontal looms in village settings are more likely to have imperfections than those woven on vertical looms in the cities or workshops where weavers strive for perfection.

red persian rug

Persian Joshaghan rug Shop Now >

Above is a hand knotted Persian Joshaghan rug. Note how the sides of the rug are not perfectly straight and the design is not completely uniform. For many customers and rug lovers these are the characteristics which drive the sale of the rug. Each imperfection adds to the one of a kind nature of an antique Oriental rug such as this.

One of the most common occurrences of “flaws” in authentic Oriental rugs is abrash. Abrash is a term used quite often in describing the characteristics of a rug. It refers to a change in the tone of the color of the wool in a specific area of the rug. For example, a field may be dark blue with a thick line of lighter blue running horizontally across it. It is easy to confuse abrash with fading. Fading is a result of long-term exposure of a rug to the sun, and some fading can occur due to wear depending on the dyes used in the rug.

persian rug runner

Abrash in a Persian rug runner Shop Now >

The rug pictured above has notable abrash at one end. Note how the band runs horizontally along the same path a weaver would be tying the knots onto the foundation. This type of variation in color would not be called fading because fading is uneven and it would be very difficult to achieve this look after completion. Abrash occurs when the weaver changes wool lots, most often because the last lot has run out, and the next lot of wool may be lighter, or darker due to any number of variables including the dye time, temperature, and type of mordant among others.

Another common flaw in Oriental rugs is white knots appearing in the field, especially after the rug has seen some traffic. These knots are the tail ends of the foundation as seen below.

Turkish sparta rug

Knot tails in a Turkish Sparta rug

 

What type of unique imperfection does your Oriental rug have?